20/20 Report Hip-Hop Special (1981) – Part 1

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

Close

Hood Hype asked:

Part 1 – An Interesting report about the rise of rap music in the early 80’s Shouts to Rapradar.

Fast Lane Street Credentials-Rap and Street Education

  • Views:534 views

Comments

CypriotVibez says:

@dashowest00 LOOOOOL

mel C says:

@1:00 “and its [rap music] use has broadened beyond mere entertainment”. It
was never for mere entertainment… moron

Ryan La Croix says:

The Big Payback by Dan Charnas says “the spring of 1981”. Blondie was on
SNL in February 1981 and the book says 20/20 approached them “a few months
later”, so I’m guessing it would be April or May 1981.

mjjcng8958 says:

i dont agree with the blondie statement. the b boys took it outside of the
bronx

Bexly says:

Rap and Street Education

i remember this shit like it was yesterday.. the birth of modern hip hop
was studied by experts and critics lol. they thought it was a fad…blondie
the first white female rapper…kurt blow….man this is the shit…. B Boy
for life!

MsTexas73 says:

NYC…1973…the beginning of rap.

Adrian Busso says:

hahahahaaaa!!!

Jason Parent says:

kids lern rhyme talk from thier street games lol

SniffyPoo says:

The world here blondie invented rap.

Sequence Unlimited. says:

kingdom blow is an awesome album!!!!

queekers says:

Kurtis Blow sounds like funk more than rap

FeverOne Dvs says:

This is the first time I witnessed Hip Hop. Does anyone know what month in
1981this aired?

egmjag says:

I clearly remember listening to the more popular rap songs of ’81 in late
summer and early fall. Those rap songs were new to me but they got a lot of
airplay on black AM stations. I still remember hearing Sugar Hill Gang’s
songs and West Street Mob’s music. They were very huge in L.A. in ’81.

pivo1981 says:

I’m guessing between September and December because the reporter says
Kurtis Blow is 22 years old and Kurtis was born August 9th, 1959.

Bubba Dak says:

Kurtis Blow looks like Kid Cudi

KingPivit says:

I saw this on Rap Radar in early summer, thanks for putting it here.

MrChiRockk says:

IDIOTS….they’re not saying Blondie invented rap. They’re saying alot of
people(mainstream) at that point in time discovered rap because of that
Blondie song……

Vic Onee says:

Rap and Street Education

@joedivision1992 NO SHE IS NOT

Nicolas O says:

Very interesting to watch.

osp80 says:

this is seriously old school hip hop,especially for network TV.3 whole
years before “old school” run-dmc,whodini,etc. this is even months before
kool moe dee took out busy bee.

PappaWheelie says:

@joedivision1992 Via TV Party, the relationship between Blondie, Fab 5
Freddy, and Basquiat was the conduit for Hip-Hop to become a commodity,
exposing Hip-Hop beyond the South Bronx/Harlem parks. Blondie’s Chris Stein
is the primary musician on all of Wild Style, and Blondie with Freddy
recruited Funky 4 + 1 to appear as the first Rap act on Saturday Night
Live. So, yes, aside from Sugar Hill/Enjoy/et al, Blondie and Freddy are
largely responsible for Hip-Hop being available to us.

ihasch says:

That’s too revisionist. This program was made at the time and says the
opposite. Rapper’s Delight hit No. 36. The Breaks hit no. 87. Rapture in
contrast was No. 1 in the US for two weeks. It definitely did more than
just a little to introduce this style to mainstream audiences and also to
show its commercial potentional (national as opposed to regional; top of
the national charts as opposed to the specialized charts). It’s a milestone
no matter how we slice it.

ihasch says:

The historical facts don’t seem to agree, but fair enough.

Sheldon Taylor says:

It was like fall….I saw the original show

Chris Mac says:

In many ways, rap’s longevity is due to marketing and image. It’s the same
with a lot of different kinds of music. There’s a core group that really
appreciates music, and people who just want to be cool. The cool people
bastardize the music itself, but they make it possible for the core fans to
hear their music in the radio. As rap became more and more popular, it was
less and less about the music. Same with rock n roll.

Leave a Reply